1 MIND THE GAP: A VOICE TO VULNERABLE PEOPLE

The gap between socio economic groups is growing. Not only differences in income or education, but also differences in health and life expectancy differ between socio economic groups. There is a growing group of forgotten vulnerable people. For example: abused children, children in poverty, people in trouble who live at campingsites, homeless people, refugees with trauma’s, very lonely people which are not using social care, people who for financial reasons did not use health care or medications, computer and health illiterates.

How can we get a better insight in the needs of these vulnerable people which have no voice? How can we prevent that we blank out these people by our research or intervention methods? How can we give them a voice so the needs of these groups are more obvious in the public domain?

Data to work with

For this challenge you can actually use many of the generic and open datasets listed here. Additionally there is one that could help your investigate. Curious to the health issues causing people to visit their “house”doktor (NL: huisarts) in 2015?

  • Nivel (Netherlands institute for health services research)
    http://www.nivel.nl/nl/NZR/incidenties-en-prevalenties
    Dutch general practice (NL: huisarts) incidence and prevalence rates for 2015 classified by health issue.
    Note: Incidence is the rate of occurrence of new cases. Prevalence is the proportion of cases in the population at a given time. Thus, incidence conveys information about the risk of contracting the disease, whereas prevalence indicates how widespread the disease is.

2 HAPPY HEALTHY PEOPLE?

Could a sunny outlook mean fewer colds and less heart disease? Do hope and curiosity somehow protect against hypertension, diabetes, and respiratory tract infections? Do happier people live longer—and, if so, why?

What do people say on a birthday party? “I wish you loads of happiness and health”. Two inseperably connected concepts. But is that truly the case? Are healthy people happier? And the other way around: are happier people healthier? And what is the definition of “happiness” and “health” for different people? What makes people happier and healthier?

Background information

Data to work with

See this list with generic and open datasets to be used for all challenges in this hackathon. Some specific and more detailed data sources have been collected to facilitate working on this particular challenge. You might find exactly the right kind of information or insight you need to make your concept or solution perfect! Take a look at these:

  • Veiligheidsmonitor (Dutch, yearly PDF report)
    http://www.veiligheidsmonitor.nl/Publicaties/Rapportages
    These reports have many numbers and insights about safety-related topics; neighbourhood trouble, safety perception, crime victims, citizens and police and prevention. Contains information on NL national level and local police districts.
  • Nivel (Netherlands institute for health services research)
    http://www.nivel.nl/nl/NZR/incidenties-en-prevalenties
    Dutch general practice (NL: huisarts) incidence and prevalence rates for 2015 classified by health issue.
    Note: Incidence is the rate of occurrence of new cases. Prevalence is the proportion of cases in the population at a given time. Thus, incidence conveys information about the risk of contracting the disease, whereas prevalence indicates how widespread the disease is.

3 TILBURG HEALTHY CITY: CREATING A HEALTH PROMOTING ENVIRONMENT

Early 19th century the link between improving people’s health and their environment has been recognized at the highest decision making levels; clean water and sanitation have decreased many infectious diseases. But even nowadays there are many chances to improve health by environmental measures. A healthy living environment is an environment that is pleasant and safe for people to live in, that supports healthy behaviour and reduces negative health consequences. Behavioural economics suggests that the context and environment in which decisions are made can have an impact on the decision-making process. This has led to the development of “choice architecture” (i.e. the practice of designing decision-making contexts) or “nudging” for healthy lifestyle behaviour. But our environment may also contribute to local residents meeting and social cohesion, green and nature on better mental wellbeing and a healthy working environment to lesser sick leave et cetera.

The question is: in what ways can we influence the environment to protect and promote public health, with the use of modern technology, what are successful tools and instruments, and what do local residents in Tilburg see and want for a healthy environment?

Information and Inspiration

  • Check out this perfect example of nudging people into using the stairs in a fun way: Piano Stairs (Youtube).
  • Or this example where scent is re-introduced to instinctively alert internet users of data leaks on personal devices : The Smell of Data

Data to work with

There is a list of data sources available to use as input or investigation for all the challenges. On top of those, we expect to provide some specific data for this challenge and Tilburg in more detail. These will be described and provided once we get closer to December 10th.

  • Tilburg Buurtmonitor (Dutch, portal)
    https://tilburg-stadsmonitor.buurtmonitor.nl/
    City Monitor. Portal containing many metrics and details about the municipality of Tilburg.
  • Offline Tilburg Data Files (Excel sheets, available during the Hackathon)
    The municipality Tilburg has provided us some additional data that we can use during this hackathon!
    More details on the content of these data files and how to use them will follow on the event itself.
  • Veiligheidsmonitor (Dutch, yearly PDF report)
    http://www.veiligheidsmonitor.nl/Publicaties/Rapportages
    These reports have many numbers and insights about safety-related topics; neighbourhood trouble, safety perception, crime victims, citizens and police and prevention. Contains information on NL national level and local police districts.

4 DATA CITIZENS: USING QUANTIFIED SELF TO IMPROVE HEALTH?

The coming of the information age has brought with it the well informed customer. First on paper, in newspapers and magazines. After that came internet, Facebook and social media. Now we see increasingly assertive citizens with free access to health service information, with a seat at the decision-making table and solution-driven procedures where they are in control. Managing their own health was difficult before the age of e-health, because of the lack of interaction, visualization, sensors and smart programmable support techniques. The current wave of apps, wearables, smart sensors & devices, digital patient dossiers and smart homes with domotica are changing that. For example, counting steps, a smart weighing scale, wrist frequency and heart rhythm with a Fitbit or smart watch. Sensors for body temperature, blood sugar, breathing and psychic well-being, smart watches, wrist or head bands, glasses, rings, motion sensors, e-bikes, daily training programs, clothes with built-in sensors, a smart refrigerator and the list of tech health gadgets is growing exponentially.

All those measured values provide the citizen with a quantified measurement of his or her health. These values can be related to either a target or a norm. That’s good indication and feedback on their efforts. Such feedback is motivational and increases a sense of responsibility. But how does this help the citizen? What kind of opportunities will appear as more of this self-measurement technology becomes available? How can we make sure that minorities and non-tech people benefit as well? How can the GGD help independent data citizens to stay healthy?

Information and Inspiration

5 CITIZENS: A NEW DATA-SOURCE?

The coming of the information age has brought with it the well informed customer. First on paper, in newspapers and magazines. After that came internet, Facebook and social media. Now we see increasingly assertive citizens with free access to health service information, with a seat at the decision-making table and solution-driven procedures where they are in control. Managing their own health was difficult before the age of e-health, because of the lack of interaction, visualization, sensors and smart programmable support techniques. The current wave of apps, wearables, smart sensors & devices, digital patient dossiers and smart homes with domotica are changing that. For example, counting steps, a smart weighing scale, wrist frequency and heart rhythm with a Fitbit or smart watch. Sensors for body temperature, blood sugar, breathing and psychic well-being, smart watches, wrist or head bands, glasses, rings, motion sensors, e-bikes, daily training programs, clothes with built-in sensors, a smart refrigerator and the list of tech health gadgets is growing exponentially.

When collected on a large scale is this “Quantified Self” citizens data usable for investigations, research, simulation or predictions? And does it provide alternatives for large scale health- or population studies? What opportunities arise when health data becomes available on a massive scale? Which Big Data is, or will, become interesting for collective public health?

What can the GGD as a governmental organization do with this citizen data? How can data about citizens contribute to public health? When is a person willing to share his or her information? “What’s in it for me?”

The same is true with regard to the (commercial) companies owning most of the citizen data today; what could be interesting opportunities for collaboration? How do we successfully balance the risks and opportunities? The new revenue models and ethical regulations of commercial companies are putting relations with patients and health consumers under pressure. Where is our data stored? How can we deal with the growing interest in citizen data from governments, insurers, researchers, pharmacists and commercial companies? Even if they are anonymous? And to what extent do you as an individual have rights?

6 WILDCARD: GGD's... moving forward

GGD’s are public organizations in a rapidly changing and disruptive environment. There are big climate changes which influences the health and safety of people. The number of people migrated influenced by war or social economic deprivation is growing. There is a growing number of issues in one health for people and cattle, whereas by antibiotics resistance infections becomes dangerous. The transitions in the social domain and health care systems are huge. In the ‘participation society’ the roles of citizens are changing.

All these transitions influence public health and thereby the role of the GGD’s and the possibilities for public health care. Technology can improve efficiency, make client records more accessible, increase professional communication, create global health networking, and increase access to services. In the public health field we are only just at a start. What are the biggest challenges and opportunities that lie ahead? What do future trends mean for our client relationships, products, services and organization of GGD’s? How do technological and other changes fit in? We give you a wild card for new solutions which will help us all together to a better public health and better services!

Information and Inspiration